We Asked, You Said, We Did

Issues we have consulted on or engaged with people about and the outcomes.

We Asked

In May 2018, a report was taken to Corporate Board recommending the development of a new Warwickshire Careers Strategy and the establishment of a new Employability & Skills Board to co-ordinate and drive this work forward within priority WE4 of the Warwickshire Education strategy. Accordingly, a draft strategy was developed by May 2019.

A consultation process on the draft strategy was undertaken from 24th June-26th July 2019. The aim of the consultation was to engage with and obtain feedback from a range of residents with a particular focus on those most likely to benefit from the strategy such as young people, adult learners both in work and seeking work, and vulnerable learners.

You Said

The consultation included an on-line survey available to all residents/stakeholders and a series of discussions with groups of keystakeholders. There was also an option to request a consultation survey document to be sent by post for return by pre-paid post or dropping off at a library.

There were 83 visitors to the on-line consultation with 19 responses spread across these types of residents: Business; Secondary School staff; FE College staff; General Public; Parent/Guardian/Carer; Special School staff.

Discussions were held with more than 100 people at these key stakeholder groups:

  • Adult & Community Learning (WCC) customers at Leamington Spa;
  • Care Leavers’ Forum (WCC);
  • Careers Leaders from secondary schools/FE colleges;
  • Coventry & Warwickshire Chamber of Commerce (South Warwickshire branch);
  • Northern Area Secondary Head Teachers and College Leaders;
  • Southam College pupils from years 9-12 ;
  • Youth Parliament (WCC).

A separate written response was received from the Federation of Small Businesses which represents the interests and views of nearly 27,000 small businesses in the county.

There was strong agreement (around two-thirds of respondents) with the vision and priorities proposed.

13 key issues and recommendations arising from feedback were presented to Cabinet on 12th September. To view this report please click on this this link.

We Did

In response to feedback, a number of changes were made to the revised strategy presented to Cabinet. The changes related to :

  • Provision of Careers Education, Information and Advice
  • Expanding the Communications plan to include more ‘grassroots’ promotion in local communities.
  • Exploring how advice and learning support provided by libraries can be promoted more widely.
  • Exploring how the Council’s Adult & Community Learning offer can be promoted more widely.
  • Ensuring the new web portal provides comprehensive information for young people (as well as other residents).
  • Further development of business/education collaboration by support from the Skills for Employment programme and working with the Federation of Small Businesses and Chamber of Commerce.
  • Providing another opportunity for Special Schools to apply for the Skills for Employment £3,000 grant for 2019/20 and encouraging them to apply for the free Careers consultancy support being introduced in September 2019.
  • Ensuring support for middle-aged Adults is clearly communicated.
  • Paying particular attention to the needs of residents with mental health issues to ensure communication of information and support is appropriate to their needs.
  •  Expanding the Skills supply and demand information currently provided to cover more sectors and job types and providing it more regularly.

Cabinet approved the strategy without any further changes on 12th September.

The Employability & Skills Board met on 27th September 2019 to review the draft implementation plan and agree specific actions for members.

The new web portal which will be the focal point for the new strategy and access to further information and support has been developed and will be ready to go live in November 2019.

The strategy will be launched in the second half of November 2019.

A review of the launch and initial implementation will take place at the next  meeting of the Employability & Skills Board on 31st January 2020.

We Asked

Consultation to change the age range at Northlands Primary School from 3-11 to 4-11 from September 2019

You Said

In total five responses were received to the consultation.  Three responses supported the proposal to change the age range from 3-11 to 4-11.  One response neither disagreed nor agreed with the proposal stating that it was a shame there would not be a nursery at the school going forward but recognised the difficulty in maintaining viability with low numbers and meeting the increasing demand for more flexible childcare.  A further respondent would like to see the nursery provision retained if possible.

We Did

County Council Cabinet approved the proposal on 11th July 2019 (link to report).  The age range change at Northlands Primary School from 3-11 to 4-11 will be implemented from September 2019.  The Published Admission Number (PAN) for the maintained nursery class will cease to exist.  Nursery provision will be available at other local providers instead of at the school.

We Asked

Consultation on the 2019/20  IRMP Draft Action Plan action 2.1 ‘to provide an additional fire station in Rugby in line with our asset management plan'.

A Rugby South fire station would allow us to relocate one of our fire appliances and crew from the CorporationStreet fire station to deal with the increased attendance time issue that will be created by the new housing development.

You Said

There were 165 responses to the consultation exercise.

Meeting the fire service emergency response standard was considered important by almost all (97%) respondents

The majority of respondents supported the plan to provide a new fire station, however there was less enthusiasm for the splitting of resources between the new and existing fire station.

Additional concerns were expressed that the centre and north of Rugby may be adversely affected by moving resources.

We Did

The feedback  from the Rugby fire station  consultation  was analysed and a report was considered by Cabinet on 12.09.2019.

The outcome of the meeting was that the 2019/20 IRMP draft action plan, which contained the proposal to provide the new fire station  was approved  and will now be progressed.

We Asked

An engagement exercise on the 2019/20  IRMP Draft Action Plan action 2.2 to explore the options for new fire station locations within the Nuneaton and North Warwickshire area.

The area profile across the north of Warwickshire is continually evolving with new housing, commercial and industrial developments and the resulting increase in both fire and road risk.

As the demographics and risk profile are ever changing we need to ensure where possible that we adapt to these changes to ensure we continue to make the best use of our resources to respond to emergencies and deliver fire prevention activities.

You Said

There were 93  responses to the engagement exercise.

The majority of respondents (55%) agreed with the reasons for exploring the options for fire station locations in Nuneaton and North Warwickshire. Though it should be noted that over a third of respondents  either didn’t answer (33%) or had no opinion (1%).

Respondents considered that the three most important things that WFRS should consider when exploring the options for fire station locations are

  • Response times
  • Access to a good road network
  • Being responded to by a Warwickshire crew

Nearly all the  respondents (94%) felt it was important that the fire service meet its emergency response standard to get a fire engine to a life risk incident anywhere in the County within 10 minutes on 75% of occasions.

We Did

The feedback  from the North Warwickshire and Nuneaton engagement was analysed and a report was considered by Cabinet on 12.09.2019.

The outcome of the meeting was that the 2019/20 IRMP draft action plan, which contained the proposal to explore the options for new fire station locations within the Nuneaton and North Warwickshire area  was approved and will now be progressed.

We Asked

Residents and stakeholders were invited to provide feedback on the 2019/20  IRMP Draft Action Plan.

You Said

There were 61  feedback  responses.

People were asked how difficult or easy it was to understand the actions listed in the action plan. 41% of respondents said it was neither easy nor difficult, 39% said it was easy or very easy, 18% said it was difficult or very difficult and  2% did not answer.

Overall the majority of respondents (63%) heard about the survey via social media (fire and rescue and county council platforms), and the county council website.

On- line engagement was the most popular choice on how we should engage with our communities with the majority  of respondents choosing on -line surveys and social media as their preferred on line  methods.

We Did

The feedback was analysed and a report was considered by Cabinet on 12.09.2019. The outcome of the meeting was that the 2019/20 IRMP draft action plan was approved  and will now be progressed.

The paper considered by Cabinet is available using this link. Minutes of the meeting are also available here.

We Asked

Current estimates indicate that there are 8,500 people living with dementia in Warwickshire and, of these, 59.5 percent have received a diagnosis.  This is below the national target of 67.9 percent. 

Warwickshire’s ‘Living Well with Dementia Strategy 2016-19’ outlined local priorities and needs but is approaching the end of the period.

Between 11 February and 22 March 2019, we carried out engagement with people with dementia, their families and carers as well as the general public and professionals.

The engagement was intended to get a better understanding of what was important to people and what needed to improve regarding dementia care and support in Warwickshire.  This was needed to help refresh the current dementia strategy and inform future commissioning of dementia services. Our intention was to seek a wide range of views through different formats and channels.

You Said

There were 116 responses to the survey. The engagement also included face to face visits with dementia groups and services (eighteen in total), encompassing the different districts and boroughs of Warwickshire.  This included 275 people.  A presentation to a meeting of GPs about the dementia strategy was also delivered.

Out of this number certain issues were highlighted:

  • The need for better information about accessing dementia support and advice;
  • Better links and co-ordination of services for support after diagnosis;
  • Better support for dementia carers in undertaking their role as a carer and accessing training;
  • Recognition of community support groups and enhancing support for them, to make sure they do not duplicate each other but, equally, that they can be sustained as meaningful services;
  • Improving access for people from BME backgrounds and people with vulnerabilities, such as learning disabilities or LGBT, and taking their needs into account in commissioning activities in the future. 

Sixty-nine percent of the survey respondents were female, which is similar to the proportion seen in national statistics which highlight the female prevalence of dementia. 

Six key themes were identified:

  • Day Opportunities available in Warwickshire benefit people with all stages of dementia (not just early stage), providing them with opportunities to socialise and be stimulated;
  • Professionals and providers highlighted a gap in that the service is not commissioned currently to provide personal care.  This means there is ‘a limited supply of dementia day care including personal care in the market’;
  • People with dementia continue to use the service until they are unable to, either because they move to residential care or develop personal care needs;
  • The routine and structure of Day Opportunities helps carers benefit from regular breaks and look after their own wellbeing;
  • Communication between the service, service users with dementia and those caring for them is ‘robust and strong’.  These can help informal carers identify when the service user might need to see their GP;
  • The service helps people with dementia maintain independence and wellbeing.

The full results of the engagement are publicly available in ‘Engagement Report: Dementia: February to March 2019’.

We Did

What are the next steps?

  • The key themes highlighted are being used to inform the refresh of the current dementia strategy and actively used in the service delivery plan.
  • Specific comments about individual services are being shared with those leading these services to inform operation and development (this includes partner agencies such as the Clinical Commissioning Groups and Coventry & Warwickshire Partnership Trust, service providers, carers and voluntary community groups);
  • Two further surveys are being formulated, targeted specifically at customers of the current Dementia Day Opportunities and Dementia Navigator customers.  This is intended to collect detailed, specific service information that will be used to shape future services’ design and specification. 

The potential areas for development stem from the key themes which were evident from the engagement exercise:

  • Information and advice;
  • Support following diagnosis;
  • Support for carers;
  • Recognition and support for the community;
  • Improving access and service uptake from people with BME backgrounds or those with a barrier to accessing services.

The refreshed strategy will also celebrate the successes achieved to date, including:

  • Dementia services and support are well utilised in general and routinely used;
  • The wide range of vibrant and diverse community support services;
  • High commitment from staff and volunteers providing enthusiastic, personalised service for people living with dementia and their carers;
  • Service users value the support received and benefit from the positive impact on them. 

We Asked

We asked for feedback on how well the respite services for adults with a disability are working in Warwickshire.

We needed this feedback to help us decide the best way to deliver these services in the future to make sure they meet the needs of everyone who uses them and their families.

You Said

28 responses were received for the Ask Warwickshire Online Survey.

 

29 responses were received for a paper customer survey.

Key themes:

  • 88% were happy overall with their respite service
  • 57% agreed that their respite service had improved during the past 5 years
  • Help with transport costs was stated as a key issue in being able to access respite services for families

Availability of emergency respite was recognised as an issue.

We Did

As a result of the engagement recommendations have been made to improve the service offer in future. This includes the provision of emergency respite beds to be available at short notice.

The current contracts for respite have now been extended up until April 2021 to allow more time to re-design the services and establish greater integration with health services.

We Asked

Consultation to change the age range at Newdigate Primary and Nursery School from 3-11 to 4-11 from September 2019

You Said

In total one response was received to the consultation, which was in support of the proposal.

We Did

County Council Cabinet approved the proposal on 11th April 2019 (link to report).  The age range change at Newdigate Primary School from 3-11 to 4-11 will be implemented from September 2019. 

Nursery provision will continue to be provided on the site of Newdigate Primary School both the school and nursery will continue to be governed by the same board and led by the same head teacher and staff. The nursery provision will operate via Community Facility Powers under the direction of the School Governors from September 2019.

We Asked

The aims of this stakeholder engagement exercise were to identify areas of success and improvement in young carers support services funded by Warwickshire County Council.

 Objectives:

  1. Understand the most significant impact a caring role has on young carers and their families in Warwickshire
  2. Understand the most important changes that young carer support has made to young carers, their families, and the ability of other stakeholders to identify and support young carers
  3. Understand what is it about the current support services that caused those positive changes
  4. Identify support gaps and views on how current support could be improved

The target audiences were:

  • Young carers
  • Parents or family of young carers
  • Schools
  • Warwickshire Young Carers (the current provider)
  • Other interested individuals or organisations

You Said

The engagement exercise involved

  • 275 young carers  attending 11 focus groups
  • 124 respondents to an online survey, mainly parents of young carers, but also some schools, Warwickshire Young Carers (the current provider) and other interested individuals and organisations
  • 28 young adult carers (18 to 25 years) from a previous engagement exercise the current provider undertook during two events, July 2018 and September 2018

Key messages:

  • The impact of caring responsibilities on young people varies significantly depending on the availability of additional support, the needs of the cared-for person, and the young carer’s individual circumstances (age, school, location etc.). Some young carers feel extremely positive about their caring role, while others experience a range of detrimental effects.
  • Young carers are clear that they need more support at school. Most do not feel understood or well supported at school, and others experience bullying linked to their caring role. Young carers want someone at school who understands them; who understands how caring responsibilities can make school harder, and for bullying to be dealt with more effectively. Most young carers want better pastoral support - to be “understood” - but extra help in lessons, for homework and for exam revision, were also mentioned.
  • Young carers and their parents overwhelmingly said that regular young carer groups are an essential source of support, and have a significant and positive impact on their lives. Meeting other young carers like themselves helps them to feel less isolated and alone. Groups are an opportunity to socialise, have fun and enjoy rare time away from their caring responsibilities. The groups act as a gateway to further specialist support, information and advice, once trusting relationships have been established.
  • Mental health issues, such as stress, anxiety and depression were the most commonly reported negative effect of caring responsibilities. Although young carers said that group attendance helps to manage these issues, many requested easier access to additional mental health support, such as counselling.
  • Common suggestions to improve group provision included more frequent groups, groups in school holidays, more outdoor activities, and help with transport to attend.
  • Warwickshire Young Carer staff reported they are working near capacity, so their ability to support a larger number of young carers through the existing service model e.g. by facilitating larger or more frequent groups, is limited.
  • A parent and social worker expressed the view that young carer support is dependent on group attendance. The support given to those who cannot, or don’t want to, attend group sessions needs consideration.

Recommendations for service specification:

In line with Warwickshire’s One Organisational Plan to use resources differently and transform the way we commission and deliver services, the Young Carers Support Service specification is being revised to take a more outcomes-focused approach. It is recommended that the following areas are considered throughout the redesign process:

1. An emphasis on partnership working with other stakeholders, including schools, to develop a better understanding of the impact of caring responsibilities on young people’s lives.

  • The provider should explore creative ways of raising awareness of young carers, and supporting schools to develop an in-house support offer.

2. The development of a robust targeted offer, making best use of signposting, community support, and digital resources in order to:

  • Enable those young carers not attending group provision to access information, advice and guidance.
  • Enable the provider to manage demand as larger numbers of young carers are identified as having support needs.

3. Improved pathways to access mental health support

  •  The provider should work with young carers to develop personalised support plans for issues that affect them most, for example, helping them to manage stress or anxiety through relaxation strategies.
  • This process should include assessment and review using an appropriate tool e.g. PANOC

4. Continued opportunities for peer support and social activities, either through group provision or creative alternatives.

5. A robust assessment process to ensure that young carers with the greatest levels of need access timely targeted interventions as part of an enhanced programme of support.

  • To make best use of resources, individual reviews should also be conducted at appropriate intervals to ensure the allocation of targeted support remains proportional to assessed levels of need.

We Did

The most important insights and recommendations from the engagement report were agreed by the Warwickshire County Council Children’s Commissioner and incorporated into the re-drafting of the service specification for Young Carer Support Services.

The revised service specification is being used to tender young carer support services, start date 1st October 2019, as part of a three year contract (plus two year extension, subject to performance).

We Asked

In November 2018 we asked for comments on the SEND & Inclusion Strategy and in particular on the:

  • Vision statement
  • Priorities
  • Measures for success

You Said

In total 274 responses to the survey were received, of which 145 were parents, 88 were staff and 41 were any other type of respondent. 88 young people responded to the learner’s survey. A full quantitative and qualitative analysis was carried out. 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed vision and priorities, with over 70% agreeing or strongly agreeing. However, the qualitative comments revealed a disconnect between the vision and the current experience with many commenting on either a poor experience or that they were pessimistic about change without additional resources. Comments were also made on a range of other matters including gaps in services, support and provision, clarification of terms, and workforce skills.

Over 50% of respondents agreed with the measures for success, however many asked for a shorter number of measures and clarity on how these linked to key activities.

We Did

trategy document was revised following these workshops and meetings.

The vision statement was revised and made more aspirational and positive.

The priorities were agreed. In order to address the disconnect, and ensure that the strategy is honest about the current position, a number of quotations were added from the consultation responses highlighting challenges and opportunities.

The headline activities of the delivery plan, addressing concerns raised, were also included in the revised strategy document.

Further to this, some of the language has been changed and terms clarified.

The measures for success section was revised to show the golden thread of priorities, to key activities, to measures for success. 

The report on feedback and the final draft of the Send and Incluson Strategy  2019-2023 considered and approved by Warwickshire County Council Cabinet can be viewed by clicking on this link.

We Asked

In November 2018 we asked for comments on the SEND & Inclusion Strategy and in particular on the:

  • Vision statement
  • Priorities
  • Measures for success

You Said

In total 274 responses to the survey were received, of which 145 were parents, 88 were staff and 41 were any other type of respondent. 88 young people responded to the learner’s survey. A full quantitative and qualitative analysis was carried out. 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed vision and priorities, with over 70% agreeing or strongly agreeing. However, the qualitative comments revealed a disconnect between the vision and the current experience with many commenting on either a poor experience or that they were pessimistic about change without additional resources. Comments were also made on a range of other matters including gaps in services, support and provision, clarification of terms, and workforce skills.

Over 50% of respondents agreed with the measures for success, however many asked for a shorter number of measures and clarity on how these linked to key activities.

We Did

The consultation analysis was considered by a workshop of head teachers, a workshop with the Parent Carer Forum and five workstream stakeholder meetings with representatives of education, schools, health, social care and parents/carers. The strategy document was revised following these workshops and meetings.

The vision statement was revised and made more aspirational and positive.

The priorities were agreed. In order to address the disconnect, and ensure that the strategy is honest about the current position, a number of quotations were added from the consultation responses highlighting challenges and opportunities.

The headline activities of the delivery plan, addressing concerns raised, were also included in the revised strategy document.

Further to this, some of the language has been changed and terms clarified.

The measures for success section was revised to show the golden thread of priorities, to key activities, to measures for success. 

The report on feedback and the final draft of the Send and Incluson Strategy  2019-2023 considered and approved by Warwickshire County Council Cabinet can be viewed by clicking on this link.

We Asked

Warwickshire County Council is reviewing the current community based Older People Day Opportunities Services that it commissions. The services are provided to people aged 65 years and over within their local community. This can often be in a building based setting such as a day centre.  There are  seven services; Waverley Day Centr; InTouch Home Care;  New Directions Rugby Ltd; Khair in the Community; (Nuneaton Muslim Society)  Satkaar Asian Elders Day Care Services;  Shri Hindu Gujarati Samaj (Anmol) and Sikh Mission Day Centre .

The services support older people and their relatives/carers to access a day service and give them the opportunity to mix with similar aged people.  The services offer activities to help support individuals health and wellbeing and they can also provide an opportunity for carers, family members or friends to have a break from their caring role.

The Council is undertaking this review to find out if the services are meeting the needs of those that are using them and their relatives/carers. This includes finding out whether older people in Warwickshire feel part of their local community and are not isolated.  Loneliness and social isolation is a significant and growing issue for older people in particular. Therefore it is important that this issue is understood and that services are offered to prevent loneliness.

This review will help to identify ways in which to improve the day service offer for older people.  This will include how any future community based Older People Day Opportunities service may assist with

  •  Enabling a person over the age of 65 to live independently within their community;
  • Offer targeted advice on many aspects of health and wellbeing;
  • Offer advice and support on practical daily living;
  • Reducing loneliness and social isolation.

You Said

167 responses were received for the surveys

The engagement findings reflected the following key themes to explore moving forward;

  •  the need to create stronger partnerships with stakeholders;
  • work more closely with carers to ensure provision supports carers respite;
  • develop more personalised services offering a wide range of activities to meet the varied needs of older people;
  • explore the opportunity to unify day opportunities, including specialist care to deal with the ever rising care and support needs of older people.

We Did

  • Greater engagement with current Day Opportunities Service providers has taken place in particular to offer support with their learning and training opportunities to assist to enhance the service that they offer.
  • A partnership with The Carers Trust (TCT) is forming to promote the day opportunities service offer for any carers that are linked in with TCT and also to support existing carers who access day opportunities
  • The engagement has evidenced that the current day opportunities service model needs reviewing to meet current needs locally; working internally to explore common themes from the older people engagement and dementia engagement to understand what steps we could explore to potentially unify day opportunities moving forward.

We Asked

The School Health & Wellbeing Service has been delivered by Compass since the award of the current contract in November 2015. The service has undergone significant transformation following a consultation and needs assessment exercise undertaken during 2014.

We wanted to consult on the current model of service delivery to inform the re-commissioning process that will commence in 2019 in order to have a new contract in place when the current contract comes to an end on the 31st October 2019. We sought views from the public, professionals and partners on the services provided through the School Health & Wellbeing Service to ensure they are fit for purpose, good quality and meeting the needs of children and families in Warwickshire.

The consultation for the Warwickshire School Health & Wellbeing Service took place between 3rd September and 12th October 2018. An online questionnaire survey and structured interviews were conducted with a range of key stakeholders, including an online parent forum via the Facebook group (Hearing the Voices of Families in Warwickshire).

You Said

The online questionnaire survey received 201 responses. The structured interviews and online forum gained the views from 21 parents/carers, teaching professionals and partners.

Online questionnaire feedback:

  • The majority of respondents (72%) were parents/carers and 14% were teachers/head teachers
  • 63% of parents/carers were unaware of the Health Needs Assessment process and 72% were unaware of the Chathealth service
  • 41% of parents/carers felt they didn’t have a need for 1:1 support at the moment, 47% were unaware they could get 1:1 support
  • When the service offers have been accessed, the majority of respondents find the service useful or very useful
  • The majority of respondents (73%) felt the priorities for the service are just right, 16% felt there were not enough, 6% felt there were too many and 5% did not respond to this question
  • A total of 52 respondents (26%) chose to leave comments or suggestions regarding the service and its priorities.

The key themes included:

  • Lack of awareness of what the service offers and the need to improve communications
  • The service needs to be more visible in schools
  • Children and families like the service and the staff when they are accessing support
  • All of the priorities are very important, in particular mental health
  • Where the SHWBS is either unable to provide support as it is not appropriate, or they need to refer on for further support, parents/carers and teachers feel there are gaps within other services available to offer the required support
  • There aren’t enough staff to do the job.

Structured interviews and online forum feedback:

  • A clear message from both parents/carers and teachers/head teachers was that they don’t know enough about what the service can do for them and they recommended undertaking more pro-active communication
  • Some schools feel the service is not as visible within the school as they would like. The service should explore how to better promote when there is a planned school visit and include a discussion on this when developing the annual health & wellbeing plan
  • Respondents felt the service should have more investment in order that schools can have more access to the service on site
  • Where the service is being used, the feedback is mainly positive, with particular mention of the referral process and the training offer.

We Did

  • The consultation has been integrated into the School Age Needs Assessment 2018
  • The findings will be incorporated into the Service Specification for the new service to be implemented by 1st November 2019

We Asked

In July this year Warwickshire County Council consulted on the proposal to stop funding the dedicated Pride in Camp Hill (PinCH) team, based in the CHESS Centre in Camp Hill, in order to deliver their savings plan. Views were sought from the local community including Camp Hill residents, Nuneaton and Bedworth Borough Council, Homes England, Barratt Homes, Lovells, and local stakeholders including local schools, the local Church and Warwickshire Community and Voluntary Action.

You Said

There were 47 responses to the online and paper surveys and 10 individuals attended the drop in sessions.  Key themes which emerged from respondents included: recognition of the contribution the team has made to building social cohesion; the benefits of having a local team to be the eyes and ears of the community; concerns at the loss of specific services including the Code Club and Camp Hill News and the need for continuing support for the final rehousing phase.  A full report on feedback is available on the main consultation page.

We Did

On November 8th 2018 Warwickshire County Council Cabinet considered a report on the outcome of the consultation. This recognised the contribution the team has made and reported the following: that some services e.g. the Code Club are not run by PinCH and will continue to be provided by others; that some services may stop e.g. Camp Hill News but that alternative ways of providing the publication are being looked at;  that by adjusting delivery of the  savings Warwickshire County Council could make a partial saving now, whilst continuing to fund PinCH at a reduced level and only to June 2020, in order to support Nuneaton and Bedworth Borough Council to fulfil the rehousing and redevelopment contracts in the final phase and manage stewardship. The full report and minutes of the meeting are available on the main consultation page.

Cabinet resolved to agree this approach and formally ‘supports the revised plan for the implementation of the OOP savings (17-18) regarding Pride in Camp Hill.  

The decision will result in changes for the local office and staff and these will be communicated to the local community over the next two months.

We Asked

The purpose of the consultation was the following:

  • To hear views and ideas from Warwickshire residents, customers, partners and key stakeholders about the current Fitter Futures Warwickshire services and what the services should look like in the future.

The Fitter Futures Warwickshire services commenced on 01 July 2015 and comprise of  a Single Point of Access (one website and one telephone number), a Weight Management on Referral service (Slimming World), Physical Activity/Healthy Lifestyles on Referral Service and Family Healthy Lifestyle service (Change Makers).

This consultation was held during a 5.5 week period (29th May and 6th July 2018).

You Said

The following items were submitted during the consultation:-

  • 172 responses in total
  • 92% survey forms were submitted online;
  • 8% survey forms were postal

The key themes expressed by Health Professionals and the general population were as follows:

  • The majority (80%) of respondents said they would like a single point of access for the FFW services.
  • The most popular FFW service was the Physical Activity/Healthy Lifestyles service (69%), followed by walking groups/opportunities (55%) and thirdly, exercise opportunities in the community (53%).
  • 38% of respondents stated they would like specialist strength and balance exercise opportunities for age 55 and over - this may be to do with the age profile of the respondents.
  • The top three options for services being delivered were in a group environment (61%), one to one basis with an exercise instructor (60%) and support via a smartphone app (25%).
  • The majority of respondents (90%) would like to be referred to the services via a GP or other health professionals (73%). Nearly half of the respondents said they would like a mental health professional to refer them into FFW.
  • Both the general public and health professionals stated a FFW service in a leisure centre, community centre and walking for health as the top 3 venues.
  • 30% of respondents would be willing to pay £11-£20 for a service. 21% of the public stated they would not pay anything for a service.
  • 35.47% respondents said they would like a social element incorporated into their FFW service whilst 24.42% answered “no they wouldn’t want this”. Most would like this in the form of formal meetups.
  • 28.5% of respondents would want information on other healthy lifestyle services whilst attending a FFW service. Whilst 30.2% said they would not want additional information beyond the service.
  • Both the general public and health professionals would like additional pathways and services to be incorporated within the community in the future model. Clear and simple referral pathways were highlighted as a key factor alongside 1-2-1 and group programme options.

We Did

The outcomes of the consultation were included in reports to Warwickshire County Council Cabinet, whereby the proposed Fitter Futures models were endorsed:

  • To continue to have a Single Point of Access with one telephone number, one website and one point of entry for referrers.
  • To continue to commission the delivery of FFW services, integrate strength and balance preventing a first fall programmes, develop an evidence based seated exercise offer in communities, including care homes, enhance walking and community exercise opportunities.
  • To deliver the services in group sessions and enhance the offer of one to one delivery options, virtual support, mobile phone text support and digital self- help tools and Smartphone Apps.
  • Develop services so that there is an increase in referrals from mental health professionals, social care workers, teachers and early years staff, occupational health and workplace managers as well as from health professionals and minimise the current barriers that prevent this.
  • Increase service delivery opportunities using other leisure opportunities, community venues, hotel fitness facilities, outdoor green gyms, fire station gyms, workplaces, in the home and in care and residential settings.
  • Work with service providers and leisure centres to set realistic pricing structures and subsidise services rather than offer them free of charge or set too high.

Reports considered by Cabinet including the full consultation report are available on the main consultation web page.

We Asked

The purpose of the consultation was the following:

  • To update the local community on the current Scheme following the completion of the detailed design stage; and
  • To collect comments and other feedback from respondents for inclusion in reports to WCC Members.

This consultation was held during a 5 week period (Tuesday 15 May 2018 – Monday 18 June 2018) seeking to engage with local residents in and around West Nuneaton, who were given an opportunity to participate in the consultation through the measures:

  • Distribution of a consultation pamphlet;
  • Online ‘Ask Warwickshire’ web pages; and
  • Online Bermuda Connection Scheme web page.

You Said

The following items were submitted during the consultation:-

  • 333 survey forms all submitted online;
  • 29 e-mails regarding the Scheme;
  • 2 written letters of objection; and
  • 15 Information Requests regarding the Scheme.

The key themes expressed by respondents concerned the following:

  • Detrimental impacts on local residents;
  • Detrimental impacts on the local area;
  • Concerns about the design of the Scheme;
  • Concerns relating to the overall Scheme; and
  • Concerns about the consultation process.

The key outcomes of the consultation are as follows:

  • 65% of the respondents either completely agreed or partly agreed that traffic congestion in West Nuneaton cause problems in their day to day activities; however
  • 64% of the respondents do not support the proposed new highway link via Bermuda Bridge.

The outcome of the consultation reinforces the strong level of opposition towards the Scheme from local residents, who primarily live in the area where the Scheme is situated.  This is a similar outcome to the original consultation carried out during the preliminary design stage in 2015.

A copy of the full consultation report is available using the link from results section of the Ask Warwickshire consultation page.

We Did

Minor modifications were made to the Bermuda Connection Scheme arising from the consultation responses.

The outcomes of the consultation were included in reports to WCC Cabinet and the County Council to be considered at their meetings in late July 2018. These reports are available using the links on the main Ask Warwickshire consultation page.

Both WCC Cabinet and the County Council endorsed the progression of the Scheme, including the addition of £4.198million to the Capital Programme from the Capital Investment Fund to deliver Bermuda Connectivity at a cost of £8.900million.

The scheme webpage will be kept updated with developments. There is also a link on this page to subscribe to updates direct by email.  Go to https://www.warwickshire.gov.uk/bermudaconnection

We Asked

We asked for your comments on the proposal to provide additional places for learners with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) at Exhall Grange School and Science College

You Said

Total written responses received: 11

Further details are in the results section of this consultation and in the report submitted to Cabinet 24th July 2018 Link to report

We Did

The School Organisation Team looked at all of the comments and produced a summary of responses.  All redacted comments were sent to Cabinet (the decision maker) for their consideration.

This proposal was approved on 24th July 2018 by Cabinet.

 

We Asked

We asked for your feedback on the draft Warwickshire Education Strategy 2018-2023 and the priorities outlined within it.

You Said

As a co-produced strategy there was a lot of feedback received through various channels. The key themes are highlighted below. For more detailed information please see the 'You said, We did' section of the Cabinet report and the appended Consultation Analysis report available in the results section of the main consultation page.

You told us:

  • 'Best possible start in life' is too broad and might not make a tangible difference.
  • We should have a broad, empowering and creative curriculum for all learners, not just vulnerable learners.
  • People want a short strategy that can be utilised in daily working life.
  • People want a kite mark for educational settings who are committed to providing a wider curriculum.

We Did

We changed Best possible start in life to’ to Champion the Early Years Foundation stage (EYFS). There is now a focus on coordinating high quality EYFS training and helping parents to provide a language rich home learning environment.

WE2 now looks at all learners before focusing in on the most vulnerable in the WE2 sub sections.

We have produced a one page booklet with the highlights. People can read more if they wish through the suite of underpinning documents.

We are going to create an App to celebrate the success of Warwickshire schools in WE1,2,3,and 4.

The wording was changed significantly following consultation; many small details were also changed as a result of feedback, for example we changed the 'strapline' , we changed references from 'pupils' to 'children', we removed 'Ofsted language', and many other updates. Reference Groups of headteachers considered the final wording and made further changes for clarity.

The strategy was been approved at Cabinet and subsequently at full Council on 26th July. The Strategy will be implemented from September 2018. The full Cabinet report and associated documents are available in the results section of the main consultation page.

We Asked

The Council proposed several changes to its existing home to school transport policy. These changes were designed to bring consistency, to unify mainstream and special needs transport, and to help manage the overall home to school transport budget.

As part of the process there was an extensive consultation with all interested parties, to which there were nearly one thousand responses.

You Said

Whilst there were mixed responses to all proposals, there were two main areas of concern.

There were significant objections to the 'safer walking routes' proposal.  This was not a policy change - having been previously agreed - but rather agreement on the implementation of the proposals to re-classify some walking routes that had previously been designated as unsafe to walk. 

Also, there were challenges regarding some of the proposed changes to transport for learners post 19 with special needs.

We Did

The initial proposals, in advance of consultation, were taken to Scrutiny in September 2017.  Subsequent to completion of consultation, the draft paper was taken again to Scrutiny in January this year in advance of going to Cabinet.

Following the responses to the safer walking routes proposal in the consultation, Scrutiny proposed that this proposal was removed from the paper.  This was endorsed by Cabinet.

The paper for Cabinet proposed six policy changes.  Although there were some objections to these policy changes, they were accepted by Scrutiny and voted through by Cabinet.  The new policy is now available on the webpage for this consultation and on the school and college travel webpages https://www.warwickshire.gov.uk/schooltransport

The council has committed to continuing dialogue with partners regarding the 19-25 proposal to ensure that transport is not a barrier to the provision of education

We Asked

Warwickshire County Council (Public Health) commission local Healthwatch in Warwickshire. The current service contract is due for renewal.

A 10 week consultation started on 17th July 2017 and ended on 22nd September 2017. This asked local people including key partners in health and social care, service users and their families and carers about their views and experiences of the local Healthwatch service.

The findings will be used to shape the new service which will be implemented in 2018. 

You Said

  • Making a contribution to improving local health and social care services was a key reason for people to share their views and experiences about health and social care services. 
  • Online methods of communication were the preferred option for both providing feedback and gaining information about health and social care services. However, face to face communication was still popular, particularly for finding out about health and social care services and for those without access to the internet.
  • The most popular way in which respondents wanted to hear news about Healthwatch Warwickshire’s activities was via electronic newsletter or the Healthwatch Warwickshire website.
  • Social media was not a popular way to get or feedback information about health and social care.
  • Respondents would prefer to be involved with Healthwatch Warwickshire by providing online feedback.
  • GP surgeries and Warwickshire County Council were the most likely organisations for people to seek help and advice from about health and social care services.

We Did

Feedback from the consultation was considered at Cabinet on 9th November 2017. The report on consultation feedback and proposed service model is available here.

This information will be used to influence and shape the service specification  for the new local Healthwatch service and ensure local peoples views are integral to the service design.